The Girl Scout Movement

February 18th Celebrates The Girl Scout Movement

Today on Days to Remember we celebrate how on February 18th 1987.

The executives of the Girl Scout movement decided to change the color of the scout uniform from the traditional Girl Scout green to the newer Girl Scout blue.

When we think of girls scout, cookies come to mind, every time we go to the grocery store around Easter time.

In 1912, in the midst of the Progressive Era, at a time when women in the United States couldn’t yet vote, a nearly deaf 51-year-old woman by the name of Juliette Gordon Low sparked a worldwide movement inspiring girls to embrace, together, their individuality, strength, and intellect.

It’s hard to believe the girl scouts have been around that long, Juliette, affectionately known as “Daisy” by her family and close friends, gathered 18 girls in her hometown of Savannah, Georgia, to share what she had learned abroad about a new outdoor and educational program for youth, and with this, the Girl Scout Movement was born.

The Boy Scout movement started on January 24 1908, which began in England with the publication of the first installment of Robert Baden-Powell’s Scouting for Boys.

However today story is about how February 18th 1987. The executives of the Girl Scout movement decided to change the color of the scout uniform.

The uniform has come full circle from the very first blue skirt, white blouse and light blue neckerchief.

The blue is echoed in today’s Daisy smock and blue components of the Cadets and senior outfits.

The khaki has also returned in the new teen uniform. The Brownie uniform still retains the hints of brown from the very early dresses.

Last, but not least, today’s junior uniform carries the shades of green that has become “the color” of Girl Scouting.

By 1928 Girl Scouting was an established program, no longer a novelty in the public eye.

The introduction of the grey-green fabric for the Girl Scout uniform was the first time the color “green” was associated with Girl Scouting.

It also was the first time the adults wore a completely different style of uniform. In 1935 a change was made to the neckline, a zipper was added and the modesty shield was removed.

The program improvements of 1914 included the break from the Girl Guide blue uniforms to a totally American khaki. The change was in direct response from members for a uniform better suited to hiking, camping and service work.

The adults in Girl Scouting were called Officers. Troop Leaders and Co-Leaders were called Captains and Lieutenants.

Girls ages 10-17 were called Girl Scouts. Younger girls were called either Brownie or Junior, but the terms were interchangeable. They work unofficially for years and were first mentioned in the handbooks in 1918. They wore the same uniform, only smaller and worked in packs instead of troops or patrols.

Today’s Girl Scout uniforms have proudly worn distinctive uniforms that symbolize the high ideals for which Girl Scouting stands.

Girl Scouts at each level now wear one required element (tunic, sash, or vest) for the display of official pins and awards. Girls can mix and match pieces from the official Girl Scout collection to complete the uniform, or add items from their own wardrobes.

As we celebrate today how on February 18th 1987. The executives of the Girl Scout movement decided to change the color of the scout uniform from the traditional Girl Scout green to the newer Girl Scout blue.

Written & Designed by JD Mitchell
jdmitchelldesigns@gmail.com

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