You Don’t Bring Me Flowers

A single red bauble decoration lies in front of a background of colourful Christmas lights shining across a reflective surface

A single red bauble decoration lies in front of a background of colourful Christmas lights shining across a reflective surface

Today on “Days to Remember” we celebrate how on December 2nd 1978, Neil Diamond and Barbara Streisand song called, “You Don’t Bring Me Flowers,” hits number one on the music charts.

“You Don’t Bring Me Flowers,” is a song that hit the top of the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1978. It was release on October 1978 but went to number one on December 2nd of that same year. The song is about two lovers who have drifted apart while they “go through the motions” and heartache of life together.

The song was written by Neil Diamond with Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman for the ill-fated TV show called, “All That Glitters.”

All That Glitters is an American sitcom by producer Norman Lear. It consisted of 65 episodes and aired between April 18 and July 15, 1977 in broadcast syndication. The show, a spoof of the soap opera format, depicted the trials and tribulations of a group of executives at the Globatron Corporation.

The twist of the series was that it was set within a world of complete role-reversal: Women were the “stronger sex,” the executives and breadwinners, while the “weaker sex” – the men – was the secretaries or stay-at-home househusbands.

The song was intended to be the theme song, but Norman Lear changed the concept of the show and the song was no longer appropriate.
Today’s YouTube presentation brought to you by user name, (Strange Universe 1) as we celebrate on December 2nd the song called, “You Don’t Bring Me Flowers,” reaching to number one on the bill board charts, in 1978.

In 1977, Diamond released the album I’m Glad You’re Here with Me Tonight, which included the track “You Don’t Bring Me Flowers” as a solo performance.

Early in 1978, Barbra Streisand covered the song on her album Songbird.

As the real life fairytale behind the song unfolded, it triggered a media buzz worldwide from Good Morning America and People magazine to the BBC.

Interest in the duet caused such a clamor on the retail level that Columbia Records was compelled to bring Streisand and Diamond into the studio to record an “official” version in October 1978.

The song reached number one on the Hot 100 chart for two non-consecutive weeks in December 1978, producing the third number-one hit for both singers.
As we remember how this song made us feel the first time we heard it back in 1978.

Written & Designed by JD Mitchell
jdmitchelldesigns@gmail.com

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