Mount Rushmore

October 4th Celebrates Mount Rushmore

Today on “Days to Remember,” we celebrate how on October 4th 1927, the first actual work of carving began on Mount Rushmore.

There is more than gold in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Above dense forests and pristine streams, the Mount Rushmore National Memorial represents a national treasure.

Symbolizing the ideals of freedom and democracy, it is a tribute to four presidents: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln and their invaluable contributions to the United States.

Mount Rushmore National Memorial represents not only the past, but also a promise for the future. It is a place surrounded by American history, where the names of Gutzon Borglum and Crazy Horse are still heard; where the buffalo once again run free in Custer State Park and the vision of the Keystone miners still cast a dim shadow on long deserted claims.

Whether a lifelong destination or a stop on your vacation itinerary, your visit to Mount Rushmore will be one you will tuck in your memory book forever, but how did the idea of Mount Rushmore come about?

Originally known to the Lakota Sioux as Six Grandfathers, the mountain was renamed after Charles E. Rushmore, a prominent New York lawyer, during an expedition in 1885, hence the name.

In 1885 Rushmore was in the Black Hills of South Dakota to check the titles to properties for an eastern mining company owned by James Wilson.
Although an Easterner, Rushmore quickly made friends among the miners and prospectors. One day he was returning to headquarters of the Harney Peak Consolidated Tin Co., Ltd., located at Pine Camp, which was north of the great granite peak soon to bear his name.

With him were a local business man, and William W. Challis, a prospector and guide. As they neared the mountain, Rushmore turned to Challis and asked its name. Challis jestingly replied: “Never had any but it has now – we’ll call the thing Rushmore.”

Today’s YouTube presentation brought to you by user name, (Smithsonian Channel) gives you glimpse into Mount Rushmore, as we celebrate how on October 4th 1927, the first actual work of carving began on Mount Rushmore.

Historian Duane Robinson conceived the idea for Mount Rushmore in 1923 to promote tourism in South Dakota. In 1924, Robinson persuaded sculptor Gutzon Borglum to travel to the Black Hills region to ensure the carving could be accomplished.

Between October 4, 1927, and October 31, 1941, Gutzon Borglum and 400 workers sculpted the colossal 60 foot (18 m) high carvings of U.S. presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln to represent the first 130 years of American history. These presidents were selected by Borglum because of their role in preserving the Republic and expanding its territory.

On October 15, 1966, Mount Rushmore was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. A 500-word essay giving the history of the United States by Nebraska student William Andrew Burkett was selected as the college-age group winner in a 1934 competition, and that essay was placed on the Entablature on a bronze plate in 1973.

In 1991, President George H. W. Bush officially dedicated Mount Rushmore, as we celebrate how on October 4th 1927, the first actual work of carving began on Mount Rushmore.

Written & Designed by JD Mitchell
jdmitchelldesigns@gmail.com

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